Oud and rose attar

Al-Jazzab

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Oud and rose. A combination that's quite common and yet most perfumes that utilize it fall short in doing it justice.

Our Layali featured oud and rose, and the sheer quality of its ingredients put it in a category of its own. But in crafting Layali, the aim was to bring out the notes already present in the Cambodian and Indian ouds that were used in the blend. Rose was only a secondary ingredient.

Al-Jazzab, on the other hand, is cloud nine for rose lovers.
The crisp alluring fragrance of Bulgarian rose otto dominates the top notes, whereas the warmer, sensual and opulent Egyptian rose permeates through the heart and base of the fragrance. The careful mix of both types of rose essential oils ensures a very rich rosiness that is present from start to finish.

In this reformulation of Al-Jazzab, no less than seven wild-harvested oud oils from six different countries were used. The careful marrying of these oud oils alone bequeathed it a remarkably complete perfuminess, and the healthy dose of rose further enhances that. Accents of black pepper, leather and smoke gives it a warmth that vividly contrasts with the crisp top notes of rose and camphor.

Dab some on and go for a stroll. Prepare to experience the Pied Piper phenomenon first-hand.

I love it without any reservations because it is an awesome mukhallat and you can tell it is made with very high quality ingredients. Right now I notice dark chocolate and smokey notes, and the roses are just beginning to emerge. It will be a treat to see how it evolves. I will definitely buy from you again.
S.N. (USA)

I’ve tasted rose petal jam that was so delicious I had to hide the spoon to keep from devouring the entire jar but I never encountered a man-eating rose until I smelled Agar Aura’s Al-Jazzab! It’s more crimson than dahlias, more velvety than coxcombs and far more brazen than the spectacular birds-of-paradise flowers that are flaunted in many exotic bouquets. Indian oud adds dark, lusty, animalic seductiveness to the winking, lemony liveliness of Damask rose, while spikenard struts down the Red Carpet with haughty herbal roughness. Most mesmerizing of all is the balsamic, honeyed sweetness of the glamorous, Moroccan varietal whose harvest is celebrated every May during the Festival of Roses in El Kelaâ M’Gouna. Although this vixen perfume may be way too wanton and wayward to wear during the day, it’s a perfume whose prickliest thorns I’d most willingly embrace at any hour if it meant that I could cozy up even closer to its sultry, provocatively disturbing scent. Although the voluptuousness of the scent makes me think of it as a woman’s perfume, it’s woody and leathery backbone make it equally at home warming the neck of my beloved.
M.W. (USA)

I did not expect to fall for this, but did pretty much immediately (the name is well chosen. ha!) My favorite mukkhalat so far (by anyone) has been your areej. but al-jazzab, with its rose and wood and smoke (and delicious earthy dirt) has vaulted right to the top.
M.O. (USA)

I didn't even have to open the package to get a whiff of the rose in Al-Jazzab! It really is something else! I mean I knew I was going to like it, based on the rose and oud combination, but I didn't know I was going to LOVE it! Could end up being my most favorite mukhallat I've purchased from you, I may even like it more than Idaino Dento.
S.K. (USA)

I just put on the Al-Jazzab, it strikes me as a bold, dark, rich and sweet, spicy and rosy fragrance. Definitely more rosy than Layali as you said in your description. I really like it!
D.C. (USA)


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